Variation in Treatment Patterns of Patients with Early-Onset Gastric Cancer

Michael LaPelusa, Chan Shen, Erin A. Gillaspie, Christopher Cann, Eric Lambright, A. Bapsi Chakravarthy, Michael K. Gibson, Cathy Eng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Early-onset gastric cancer (EOGC), or gastric cancer in patients younger than 45 years old, is poorly understood and relatively uncommon. Similar to other gastrointestinal malignancies, the incidence of EOGC is rising in Western countries. It is unclear which populations experience a disproportionate burden of EOGC and what factors influence how patients with EOGC are treated. Methods: We conducted a retrospective, population-based study of patients diagnosed with gastric cancer from 2004 to 2018 using the National Cancer Database (NCDB). In addition to identifying unique demographic characteristics of patients with EOGC, we evaluated (using multivariable logistic regression controlling for year of diagnoses, primary site, and stage) how gender/sex, race/ethnicity, treatment facility type, payor status, and location of residence influenced the receipt of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Results: Compared to patients 45–70 and >70 years of age with gastric cancer, patients with EOGC were more likely to be female, Asian/Pacific Islander (PI), African American (AA), Hispanic, uninsured, and present with stage IV disease. On multivariable analysis, several differences among subsets of patients with EOGC were identified. Female patients with EOGC were less likely to receive surgery and chemotherapy than male patients with EOGC. Asian/Pacific Islander patients with EOGC were more likely to receive chemotherapy and less likely to receive radiation than Caucasian patients with EOGC. African American patients were more likely to receive chemotherapy than Caucasian patients with EOGC. Hispanic patients were more likely to receive surgery and chemotherapy and less likely to receive radiation than Caucasian patients with EOGC. Patients with EOGC treated at community cancer centers were more likely to receive surgery and less likely to receive chemotherapy than patients with EOGC treated at academic centers. Uninsured patients with EOGC were more likely to receive surgery and less likely to receive chemotherapy than privately insured patients with EOGC. Patients with EOGC living in locations not adjacent to metropolitan areas were less likely to receive surgery compared to patients with EOGC who resided in metropolitan areas, Conclusions: Patients with EOGC are a demographically distinct population. Treatment of these patients varies significantly based on several demographic factors. Additional analysis is needed to elucidate why particular groups are more affected by EOGC and how treatment decisions are made for, and by, these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3633
JournalCancers
Volume14
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Variation in Treatment Patterns of Patients with Early-Onset Gastric Cancer'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this