When Do Police Stressors Particularly Predict Organizational Commitment? The Moderating Role of Social Resources

Jaeyong Choi, Nathan E. Kruis, Ilhong Yun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study uses data from 570 male police officers working in 16 substations in South Korea to examine the impact of job stressors (e.g., victimization, authoritative organizational culture, and perceptions of unfair work assignments) on organizational commitment. Furthermore, we examine the conditioning effect of social resources on organizational commitment. The results show that organizational characteristics (e.g., authoritative organizational culture, unfair work assignments, and conflict with coworkers) influence officers’ organizational commitment more so than victimization experiences. The results also show that social resources spill over into the workplace and condition the effects of organizational culture on predicting organizational commitment. Potential policy implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-546
Number of pages20
JournalPolice Quarterly
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Law

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