When to Hold and When to Fold: Detecting Structural Changes in Statistical Learning

Benjamin D. Zinszer, Daniel J. Weiss

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Studies of statistical learning have documented a remarkable sensitivity to structural regularities in both infants and adults. However, most studies of statistical learning have assumed a single underlying causal structure with uniform variance. In previous work in which two structures are presented successively, a primacy effect has been reported in which only the first structure is acquired. The present study explores the conditions under which such primacy effects are observed and learners are capable of acquiring both structures. We argue that learners can detect multiple structures by monitoring the consistency of the input.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCooperative Minds
Subtitle of host publicationSocial Interaction and Group Dynamics - Proceedings of the 35th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2013
EditorsMarkus Knauff, Natalie Sebanz, Michael Pauen, Ipke Wachsmuth
PublisherThe Cognitive Science Society
Pages3858-3863
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9780976831891
StatePublished - 2013
Event35th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society - Cooperative Minds: Social Interaction and Group Dynamics, CogSci 2013 - Berlin, Germany
Duration: Jul 31 2013Aug 3 2013

Publication series

NameCooperative Minds: Social Interaction and Group Dynamics - Proceedings of the 35th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2013

Conference

Conference35th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society - Cooperative Minds: Social Interaction and Group Dynamics, CogSci 2013
Country/TerritoryGermany
CityBerlin
Period7/31/138/3/13

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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